Police visit Liverpool mosques, synagogues and churches to make ‘strong stance’ against religious hate crime

Merseyside Police has attempted to reassure faith groups it has a ‘strong stance’ against religious hate crime.
Al-Rahma Mosque, Liverpool. Image: Liverpool Muslim Society Al-Rahma Mosque, Liverpool. Image: Liverpool Muslim Society
Al-Rahma Mosque, Liverpool. Image: Liverpool Muslim Society

Mosques, synagogues and churches in Liverpool have seen an increased police presence following Sunday’s terror attack outside Liverpool Women’s Hospital.

Police community support officers have been visible in the community to ensure worshippers felt safe and knew what action they can take if they fall victim to hate crime, according to Merseyside Police.

A mosque in South Liverpool was among the places visited by Liverpool Community Policing Inspector Dave Uren and colleagues in bid to show the ‘strong stance’ of the police against religious hate crime.

Liverpool Riverside Labour MP Kim Johnson told the House of Commons that her office had received reports of Muslim women facing abuse following the terror incident.

She said: “Incidents like these always result in a spike in race hate, particularly in the Muslim community and my team have been hearing of incidents where women wearing the hijab have been facing abuse.”

Faith leaders from Christian, Muslim, Jewish and Hindu faiths gathered outside Liverpool Women’s Hospital yesterday and called for peace and unity across the city.

Merseyside Police said there would be a continued police presence across the city and that they would be engaging with the community in a number of ways including through schools and faith groups.