The Merseyside woman blazed trail 50-years before the Lionesses’ Euro 2022 triumph

Had she still been alive today, there would be few female footballers prouder than Sylvia Gore of England’s history-making victory over Germany in the final of the UEFA Women’s EURO 2022 at Wembley.

Sylvia Gore MBE in her playing days
Sylvia Gore MBE in her playing days
Sylvia Gore MBE in her playing days

Had she still been alive today, there would be few female footballers prouder than Sylvia Gore of England’s history-making victory over Germany in the final of the UEFA Women’s EURO 2022 at Wembley.

Prescot- born Sylvia was a pioneer of the women’s game and the young Lionesses, who have become sporting icons following their triumph, owe a great deal to people like her and the dedication and time she devoted to her chosen sport.

The 71-year-old, who was born in the town and raised on Merseyside, died in September 2016 after a battle against cancer.

She made history on November 18, 1972, as she netted the opening goal in England’s first official international match - a 3-2 victory over Scotland in Greenock.

A former pupil at Our Lady’s Catholic Primary School in Prescot and St Edmund Arrowsmith Secondary School, she was encouraged to play football by her father and uncle who played for Prescot Cables.

Her head teacher stopped her playing for the school team but she joined Manchester Corinthians in her teens, playing in charity matches across the world.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, in his role as president of The Football Association and FA chairman Greg Dyke hands a medal to Sylvia Gore as part of awarding medals to 150 grassroots heroes for their outstanding contribution and service to football.
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, in his role as president of The Football Association and FA chairman Greg Dyke hands a medal to Sylvia Gore as part of awarding medals to 150 grassroots heroes for their outstanding contribution and service to football.
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, in his role as president of The Football Association and FA chairman Greg Dyke hands a medal to Sylvia Gore as part of awarding medals to 150 grassroots heroes for their outstanding contribution and service to football.

She went on to manage the Welsh women’s football team throughout the 1980s and she also worked as a football development officer for Knowsley Council.

She was made an MBE in the 2000 New Year honours, for services to girls’ and women’s football.

In 2014 she was inducted into the National Football Museum’s Hall of Fame before becoming the first female director at the Liverpool County FA.