New Tate Liverpool exhibition Radical Landscapes explores climate emergency

A real highlight of the exhibition is Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields, which brings live plants and trees into the heart of the gallery.

From rural raves in Castlemorton to anti-nuclear protests at Greenham Common, this exhibition presents a radical view of the British landscape in art.

Expanding on landscape art as being limited to paintings of lush green hills, the art in this exhibition reflects the diversity of the British landscape and the communities that inhabit it.

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Laura Bruni, assistant curator at Tate Liverpool, tells LiverpoolWorld how mindful they were when curating the exhibition.

She said: “There’s a whole section completely related to the climate emergency, but also when we installed the exhibition, we worked with a wonderful design studio Based in London.

“So we came up with the design of the exhibition, which really ties everything together, but also we used sustainable materials to reduce the waste from putting together a major exhibition like this.

“Most of the works here are from Tate’s own collection, so we reduce the number of loans.”

‘The cycle of nature is brought to life in this space’

A real highlight of the exhibition is Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields, which brings live plants and trees into the heart of the gallery.

Laura Bruni said: “Every day of the year has been brought to life by a plant, farming tool, or a mineral. The cycle of nature is brought to life in this space.”

Radical Landscapes features over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by artists including Jeremy Deller, Ingrid Pollard and many more.

The exhibition alos includes two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas.

In Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), Le Bas explores her English-Romany heritage to engage with themes of trespass and climate change. Davinia-Ann Robinson’s installation Some Intimacy combines salvaged clay and sound to powerful effect.

Radical Landscapes is at Tate Liverpool until September 4.