Turner Prize has ‘always had a really strong connection with Liverpool’

The winner of the prestigious award will be announced in December at an award ceremony in the city.
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The four-person shortlist for the Turner Prize 2022 was announced at Tate Liverpool this week as one of the world’s best-known art awards returned to the city for the first time in 15 years.

An exhibition of the artists’ work will be held at the Tate gallery on the Albert Dock from 20 October 2022 to 19 March 2023.

The quartet shortlisted for this year’s Turner Prize are Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin.

Tate Liverpool was the first gallery outside London to host the prize in 2007 when it helped launch the city's year as European Capital of Culture.

The winner will be announced in December at an award ceremony in the city.

What’s been said

Helen Legg, director of Tate Liverpool and co-chair of the Turner Prize jury, said: "I think there's always been a really strong connection with the Turner Prize partly perhaps because Liverpool was the first city outside of London to host it, and now it's the only city outside of London to host it twice.

“So we do have a lot of connections as a city; we've got former prizewinners who grew up in the region with Mark Leckey and Tony Cragg.

“Obviously, we've got the amazing work in Granby, which won a few years ago. Then there's Anthony Gormley's Another Place at Crosby beach, which is a really well-loved work by a Turner Prize winner."

The shortlisted artists

Nominated for her solo exhibition RUPTURE NO 1: blowtorching the bitten peach at Tate Britain, London and her Fourth Plinth commission, THE END. Heather Phillipson's wide-ranging practice involves collisions of wildly different materials, media and gestures.

Part of Heather Phillipson’s installation Rupture No 1: Blowtorching The Bitten Peach. Image: Tate BritainPart of Heather Phillipson’s installation Rupture No 1: Blowtorching The Bitten Peach. Image: Tate Britain
Part of Heather Phillipson’s installation Rupture No 1: Blowtorching The Bitten Peach. Image: Tate Britain

Sin Wai Kin has been nominated for their involvement in the British Art Show 9 and their solo presentation at Blindspot Gallery, Frieze London. Sin brings fantasy to life through storytelling in performance, moving images, writing, and print.

Nominated for her solo exhibition Carbon Slowly Turning at MK Gallery, Milton Keynes. Ingrid Pollard's work questions our relationship with the natural world and interrogates ideas such as Britishness, race and sexuality.

Veronica Ryan's been nominated for her solo exhibition Along a Spectrum at Spike Island, Bristol and her Hackney Windrush Art Commission in London. Ryan creates sculptural objects and installations using containers, compartments, and combinations of natural and fabricated forms.

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