The Beatles: one third of Gen Z don’t know who the iconic Liverpool band are

A new study has shown that a third of the people under the age of 26 are unfamiliar with the Fab Four.

Liverpool is the proud home of The Beatles and boasts a host of great Fab Four-related tourist attractions throughout the city.

From the statue down on the waterfront to The Beatles Story museum and famous Cavern Club - not to mention a new upcoming £2 million Beatles-inspired project named The Pool destined for Liverpool Waterfront.

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But despite being one of the most famous bands of all time a new study has found that one in three people in Generation Z - people born between 1997 and 2021, aged 10 and 25 - are unfamiliar with The Beatles.

One in three people in Gen Z don’t know who The Beatles are.

Is it a concern for the Liverpool’s Beatles tourist attractions?

Not according to a spokesman for The Beatles Story, who insists the world’s love for the band isn’t going to die out any time soon.

“As the world’s leading Beatles exhibition, we’ve found our Gen Z visitors are fascinated by the story,” the spokesman said.

“These revelations provide evidence that The Beatles’ legacy spans generations and the world’s love for The Beatles isn’t going to die out any time soon.

“The Beatles’ ground-breaking discography has proved itself to be timeless, and continues to speak to every generation even 60 years on.

“We have no doubt that there will be Beatles fans around for a long time to come and we will continue to engage with younger audiences through our work to uphold their amazing legacy in their hometown of Liverpool.”

More generational findings from the study

British radio manufacturers Roberts surveyed 2,000 people in the study and also found that half of Gen Z don’t know who David Bowie was and only one in five were familiar with Madonna.

Gen Z also didn’t know who Aretha Franklin was with 60% not recognising the iconic star.

Other artists low down on Gen Z’s list were U2 and The Supremes.

The study found that people in Gen Z were reluctant to listen to music that was released before they were born.

But it also found that Baby Boomers (those aged 55 to 73) were not familiar with modern music.

Three in five didn’t know who Harry Styles was and 50% didn’t know Drake.