How many Covid cases are there in Liverpool City Region today? Daily cases near me - and areas worst affected

Here is an area-by-area breakdown of daily COVID-19 cases in the region.

COVID-19 is once again in focus as infections and hospitalisations increase sharply across the United Kingdom.

Researchers believe a major part of this hike in cases is due to the emergence of a more contagious variant that has become the dominant strain across the country - BA.2, also known as ‘Stealth Omicron’.

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The phasing out of restrictions, which is at different stages across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, is also said to have contributed, as have changes in public behaviour.

Here, LiverpoolWorld can reveal the current COVID-19 hotspots across the Liverpool City Region according to the daily official figures.

This article will be regularly updated each weekday, so always come back to see the latest picture.

The UK Health Security Agency has urged people to take precautions to limit the spread of the virus, including getting all their vaccination doses, taking a test if they have symptoms and staying at home if they test positive.

Dr Mike Gent, COVID-19 Public Health Incident Director, said: “COVID-19 is circulating at increasing levels and while rates of severe disease and death remain low, hospital admissions have risen.

“As we learn to live with COVID-19, it’s vital that everyone keeps taking the necessary steps to limit the spread of COVID-19.”

How many COVID cases are there in my area?

Here are the latest figures for each of our local council areas in the week ending April 2, 2022.

Rates of COVID-19 in Sefton are currently below the UK average. There were 1,801 recorded cases, which is a rate of 6.5 cases per 1,000 residents.

Rates of COVID-19 in Wirral are currently above the UK average. There were 2,417 recorded cases, which is a rate of 7.5 cases per 1,000 residents.

Rates of COVID-19 in Halton are currently above the UK average. There were 997 recorded cases, which is a rate of 7.7 cases per 1,000 residents.

Rates of COVID-19 in St. Helens are currently below the UK average. There were 1,195 recorded cases, which is a rate of 6.6 cases per 1,000 residents.

Rates of COVID-19 in Knowsley are currently below the UK average. There were 973 recorded cases, which is a rate of 6.4 cases per 1,000 residents.

Rates of COVID-19 in Liverpool are currently below the UK average. There were 2,955 recorded cases, which is a rate of 5.9 cases per 1,000 residents.

All figures include both positive PCR and lateral flow tests.

Where are the biggest COVID-19 hotspots in my area?

Some neighbourhoods in and around the Liverpool area have far higher rates of coronavirus than others.

Here are the 10 neighbourhoods in our area with the highest rate of coronavirus infections for the week ending April 2, 2022.

Poulton, Raby Mere & Thornton in Wirral: There were 75 new cases, which is equivalent to 10.5 cases per 1,000 people.

Hesketh Park in Sefton: There were 78 new cases, which is equivalent to 10.3 cases per 1,000 people.

Allerton in Liverpool: There were 67 new cases, which is equivalent to 10.0 cases per 1,000 people.

Formby South West in Sefton: There were 55 new cases, which is equivalent to 10.0 cases per 1,000 people.

A letter this week says it makes sense to wear face masks in public places.

Hoylake in Wirral: There were 78 new cases, which is equivalent to 9.9 cases per 1,000 people.

Claughton North in Wirral: There were 79 new cases, which is equivalent to 9.8 cases per 1,000 people.

Caldy & Newton in Wirral: There were 66 new cases, which is equivalent to 9.4 cases per 1,000 people.

Dovecot in Liverpool: There were 54 new cases, which is equivalent to 9.2 cases per 1,000 people.

Mossley Hill West & Sefton Park in Liverpool: There were 83 new cases, which is equivalent to 9.2 cases per 1,000 people.

Ainsdale West in Sefton: There were 54 new cases, which is equivalent to 9.1 cases per 1,000 people.

What are the current coronavirus rules in England?

Changes in government guidelines have made wearing a mask no longer mandatory in the majority of indoor settings.

However, face coverings are still required for visits to healthcare facilities such as care homes and surgeries.

You no longer have to self-isolate if you test positive for COVID-19 after the legal requirement was lifted on February 24.

Instead, people with coronavirus are advised to stay home if they can to avoid spreading the virus.

Also, you no longer need to self-isolate or take daily PCR or lateral flow tests if you have been in contact with someone who has COVID-19.

The government is set to stop offering free tests to the public from April 1, and you no longer need to take a test when arriving into the country from foreign countries - a rule that was lifted on March 18.